You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown: a Stunning Return to Live Theatre from the University of Melbourne

The band is outstanding, bolstering the show’s pep, and the vocal performances from the cast are impressive. The childish, nasal tones of their voices are grating by the end, but it is certainly the kind of performance the musical calls for, and the cast delivers. Continue reading You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown: a Stunning Return to Live Theatre from the University of Melbourne

Asynchrony: Monash University Student Theatre Charms with an Immersive Online Production

Asynchrony emphasizes spectacle and plot in equal measure. Particularly striking is the manipulation of the sense of scale, which transforms the experience into an adventure. The set pieces are all impressive, and when things happen in the environment, these changes are perfectly executed. It is unusual to commend a student theatre group for a show being presented so professionally, but MUST has never had a show like this before, and there is little precedent beyond Monash for this kind of theatre. Continue reading Asynchrony: Monash University Student Theatre Charms with an Immersive Online Production

Things I Know to be True: A Knockout of an Australian Family Drama

First performed in 2016, Andrew Bovell’s Things I Know to be True explores love and its damaging effects on a quintessentially suburban family in Adelaide. The Prices aren’t well off, but they aren’t struggling either; Bob and Fran have managed to bring up four children on the salaries of a retired car factory worker and a nurse. Just when the youngest is about to move out and things should be slowing down for them, the complicated lives of their offspring come crashing down. Continue reading Things I Know to be True: A Knockout of an Australian Family Drama

between here and when i tell you – A Collective of Artists Versus the Digital Age

Following an insightful interview with two artists of the University of Melbourne’s Student Union’s Union House Theatre and the Dirty Laundry Collective regarding their recent collection of work – between here and when i tell you (BHAWTY) – I was more than excited to view the outcome of the project. There are eight individual performances from both alumni and student artists at Unimelb, each with their unique style and artistic direction. The ‘web-stage’ is an interactive space where you can explore each work either on its own or in a sequence, with hidden easter eggs throughout. Almost each image can lead you somewhere new, so keep a look out for things to click on so you can make the most of the experience. Continue reading between here and when i tell you – A Collective of Artists Versus the Digital Age

Spa Wars: No Spa, All Soap

Typically I wouldn’t resort to plagiarism to write a review, but “in light of tHeSe UnCeRtAiN tImEs”… I’ve evolved. Watching musicals in theatres is so 2019. Zoomsicals – that is, a musical comedy on Zoom – are where the action’s at. No longer bound by the laws of “respectability” and “integrity”, this year it’s perfectly acceptable to watch live shows with no pants, in a bathtub, or just anywhere but a brick-and-mortar venue. Yes, I’m talking about Medleys 2020 – Spa Wars: A New Soap. Continue reading Spa Wars: No Spa, All Soap

Tales of Ghosts and Stardust in Dave Malloy’s Stunning Ghost Quartet

Watching Ghost Quartet is a bit like watching The Matrix or Black Mirror. For a while you’re not too sure what’s going on, but you’re certain it’s going to be great. As Ghost Quartet unfurls like a web of stories across four generations, the audience is given as many questions as they are answers. Essentially, it’s an exploration of the human preoccupation with ghosts. Are they real? Do we want ghosts to be real? Who haunts us? Continue reading Tales of Ghosts and Stardust in Dave Malloy’s Stunning Ghost Quartet

Interview with the Creators: between here and when i tell you

I sat down virtually with two creators of this event, Xanthe Beesley and Harriet Wallace-Mead to better understand their process and the ideas behind creating this event that so many of us need – though some might not know it yet. Both creators view the program of events as an “experiment”. They are physical theatre artists who have ventured into the digital world, a place with its own set of challenges, but I believe in the pay-off for all their creative efforts. Continue reading Interview with the Creators: between here and when i tell you

She Loves Me: Storybook Lovers in 1930s Hungary

The tried and true formula of a well-received musical goes like this: an accessible story, a grounding, genuine performance and impeccable production. But at the root of it, the best of them should be distilled down to two elements – musicality and a sound script. With these in play, any embellishment is hardly necessary. For decades She Loves Me has ticked all these boxes, so much so that it has been included in every possible ranking list of must-see musicals. Continue reading She Loves Me: Storybook Lovers in 1930s Hungary

Closet Works v. 4: Into the Digital Wild

This might sound overly sensational, but Joshua William Gelb’s Closet Works series proves that a new theatrical laboratory involving entirely new possibilities for the medium can be constructed amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Gelb, an independent New York-based director and performer has converted his home closet (a white box with dimensions of 4x8x2 feet) into a space for live digital performance. Since March, Gelb has performed and livestreamed from this closet in his East Village apartment, working remotely with his supporters and collaborators. Continue reading Closet Works v. 4: Into the Digital Wild

Seeing Our Reflections in Yael Farber’s Take On The Crucible

Audience interaction. At its worst, it’s cringy and unnecessary, but when it’s done well it makes for a theatrical experience like none other. This was one of the main drawing points for Yael Farber’s 2014 production of The Crucible at London’s Old Vic – and oh, does it deliver. Through a unique, subtle take on audience involvement, an immersive soundscape and set, and a devoted cast, Arthur Miller’s 1953 script burns bright in this acclaimed production. Continue reading Seeing Our Reflections in Yael Farber’s Take On The Crucible